The Ed Eppley Experience
The Ed Eppley Experience

Episode 35 · 1 year ago

From Renting Mats and Uniforms to Helping Nike Redefine Sport

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

I wrote about Colin Crotty in my book, Let's Be Clear. He comes from a family of entrepreneurs, so it's not surprising that he runs one of the most successful branding firms in the US. What's unusual is how he's developed and used his management and leadership skills so successfully in such different businesses. Whether you've read Let's Be Clear or not, you'll appreciate getting to learn more about this special leader.

Welcome to the ED epley experience.Twenty minutes that simplifies the complex job of managing and leading people and inspires youto take action on what you probably already know to build and sustain a smartand healthy business. Here's your host, Ed Efley, to introduce this week'sguest and business leader. Welcome to the ED eple experience, the podcast designedto simplify the complex job of managing and leading people, and our goal todayis every podcast, is to share with you at least one proven business practicefrom someone who's lived that practice to help you build a more sustainable and profitableand purpose driven company. All right, the adjectives to describe my guest today? Extremely Bright, charismatic, intense, boys hidden. Can he be?Intense, balanced, innovative, creative? I think I'll just I'll just addthis on. I don't have a written down but as I'm looking at hisface here today a via the video, I'm going to say risk taker.He is not afraid to take a calculated risk and I've seen him do thata number of times. Ladies and gentlemen listening today, would you please helpme welcome my good friend Colin Crotty to the ED epley experience. Welcome,Colin. Thanks, thanks for having me. This is awesome and flatter dress meto join your podcast. That I am. I am excited you're here. Whenever I do these events, especially with people have been around for along period of time, it's kind of weird because, you know, I'velived long enough that there are things that I know about people, but there'scertain things I've forgotten about people. So I've known you long enough that youfall into that ladder category that I'm sure you're going to remind me of somestuff that I got. Oh my God, yeah, that's right, I've forgottenabout that. I think it would be important for you to help theaudience understand how far back we go and how long we've known each other,because that probably gives them some context.

Well, it's been a while onit at might data seeach respectively, but I want to say I was thinkingabout this the other day. I think the first time we met would havebeen nineteen ninety seven. So I had to reverse engineer time in my headto go back to when I believe I actually was introduced to you in theback building at our old corporate office of Bandai Karate I believe. I believeit was nineteen ninety seven, the old corporate office, even before you'd movedown to the new one in Springbroo. Huh, Wow, absolutely. Yeah, Yep, brant Pike. Yeah, that's right. YEA, YEA,one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven. So it's been some time. Well, tell the audience what you were doing then, but in the comp andwhat that was about. Yeah, I mean, I think the simplest wayto say it was, you know, I was on a track to bean industrial launderer. I was the first of the fourth generation, which wasexciting. You know, when I was a kid I wanted to be oneof three things. I either wanted to be an astronaut, fly a planeor work for the family business and couldn't get into the Naval Academy or theAir Force Academy. And I had a father and a few of his brothersthat I really admired and looked up too. So that was my career path.So I stumbled into that business and at the ripled age of around fourteenand up until I was in my mid s. So just fell in lovewith it. Just had a real passion for everything we did. So itwas exciting. It was a remarkable business and the barrier to entries pretty highto be in that reuniform and Matt Rental Business. I can't imagine somebody sayingI'm going to start that business today, right. I can't imagine something.So let's go ahead and a start that. It would be immensely difficult. Iwonder what the business has been like with the COVID crisis. You know, that's a good question. I do have some connections back from a fewyears past and I think you know, you can look at some of thelarger players in the space. Obviously my heart my head got right to sintoss and they've done an exceptional job of...

...diversification over the years and I thinka lot of organizations you know, postcovid world, as long as you're diversifiedyou're going to be in pretty good shape. And what I do know about senttoss as they've done just an exceptional job over the years of diversifying theirproducts and service offering. So yeah, I think they're doing okay. Soso you are the fourth generation, which is very unusual in a business thatthe business even gets that far. But I still think of your dad anduncle as entrepreneurs in the truest sense of the word, even though they didn'tstart the business. And and here you are, you know, where generallythe children of entrepreneurs don't generally see the same level of success as did theirparents or their their earlier family members. And yet you've you've got the sameentrepreneurial genes and you and done extremely well. Explain how you scratch that Itch,because, I mean you had a lot of options coming out of thebusiness. When it's sold this Sinto us. How did you make the decision togo where you went? Well, I hope my kids don't hear thatbecause, you know, I think, I think they've said they want tooutperform me and whatever I do, whether that's going for a run or shootinghoops or get behind a wakeboard boat. You know, it's a good question. You know the ITCH. You're your completent saying we do well. Ithink for me, I think probably one of the one of my traits,one of my flaws, is my insecurity. I think one thing that I've learnedfrom my father and his brother, specifically Dan and Bob. You know, they never were satisfied. You know, they're always operated with that hunter mentalityof always being able to do better, and a lot of that started andstop with the relationships they had in their life, both personally and professionally. Right. So for them it is just a constant quest to make everybodyaround them better. And so so for me, you know, when Ihad the chance to stay in the industry shortly after the company sold, itwas a pretty easy decision because, quite honestly, the only reason I wasin that space was because of the family...

...component and and all the people thatwe got out of that every day to serve. And you know, whenI talk about insecurity, that's more about what is the driving force of neverlooking back and always moving forward. And so the conversations we always had aroundthe dinner table at my house or what are we doing to be of serviceto the people that work for us, because I never really heard the wordemployee, it was always team member, and then how do we continue tomake ourselves better servants to the people and the people we employed? And sofor me that was always ingrained at me at a very young age and Ithink that helped push my competitive spirit of always trying to make the people aroundme better. So I could be the best version of myself and I thinkthat itch you know, I was able to scratch that and to what I'mdoing now just because it was a complete shift from what I was and itwas one hell of a challenge. So well so. So we got toput context in this for the the audience. Colin is CEO of an organization calledhyperquake. I should haven't done a better job of explaining that the beginning. There is what hyperquake is today. There is what you bought into whenyou joined the organization, and they're not anywhere near the same entities. Sowhy don't you give us a little bit of background about what it was andwhat it's become today, because it's fascinating conversion. Yeah, it's shifted quitea bit. So I walked in October twenty three, two thousand and six. At that point we were really sort of in the throes of what Iwould call the next digital evolution, coming out of what we will call sortof the tech tech crisis and early S, and then the shift to what itwas when I joined the company no six, which was digital marketing.You know, I was introduced to hyperquake through my wife. She had afriend who was a partner here. He had done a pretty darn good jobof building something that was unique and truly differentiated in the space. I walkedin the door, I had no idea what it was that they did.I just know that they had something and they needed help growing it. Andimmediately walked in the door I was wearing black sport coat, black pants,white shirt and a tie and when I...

...walked through the first door, forthrough the door you Feb tell the story, kid walked up and looked at mesaid Hey, are you the delivery guy from o Charlie's restaurant for ourlunch? And he was wearing cargoes, shorts and you know, I thinkit was like a fish t shirt and I had on backwards and I'm like, I like this place. I don't know what in the heck they do, but I can't wait to dig in and find out more. You knowthat company, you know six and interactive gaming and clients like paramountain scripts andTime Warner and, excuse me, warner brothers. You know it was.It was a totally different company then and you know we've changed quite a bitsince then. But when I walked into it, primarily our focus was helpingpedal consumer brands digitally. Yeah, and and really making stronger connections online.And today it's a radically different firm. Well, first of all, justput a bow around what it is your you would say you do today,and then, more importantly, help the audience understand how you transitioned that andpivoted, and I would say probably have pivoted several times. It's not apivot, it's a series of those that I would call it. I've observedyou make. Yeah, there's been a lot, so I'll try to sortof TRUNC keep this and pair it down. We move people to move product.You know, we sort of dabble in all parts of strategic creative consultationfrom execution all the way, if I start at the bottom and say execution, and go to market to upstream. So we spend a lot of ourtime working with organizations and the BETOB space, be Toc space and direct to consumerspace, and our job is to help organizations evolved internally first, sothey can understand and how to make stronger connections with the people outside their wallswho they try to push product to. Yeah, I'll tell you it's alot of work, but if that's the fun work. And then the executionagainst those strategies ends up being what, as a consumer, what you seeon shelf or just in market for any...

...business. That execution, that visualrepresentation, representation of what that might actually be and how it manifests itself andmarket is how we've moved from up streamed downstream. So when was the firstreal pivot? You know, it was digital marketing. It was a formof a digital advertising agency, for lack of better words. Right, Imean that's essentially what you bought into. And then when was the first realmove? Yeah, the first real move in the shift away from that was, okay, driven by the downturning the economy. Yeah, so, soI look look at some of my predecessors and what happened, and you lookat two thousand and one was September eleven and everything that impacted their business.And then you fast forward, you know, O eight usand nine hundred and tenand the financial crisis, and we had to take a really hard lookinside, and I think that's that's where you came in. When we startedto take a look at who we were strategically. What was the real differencewe were making with our clients and why were our clients choosing us in thefirst place, and the ability to sort of contextualize their business problems and thenstart to shift and help those clients pivot and understand the world today outside theirwalls. No nine really gave us that New Strategic Foundation for future growth.That was a response to an external change. Do you think you would have gonethat way anyways? Or was the downturn in the economy something that justforced you to have to say you know, and even though it might have nothave been because you've financially had no choice, but at least it causedyou to just be disrupted and say this may not be sustainable. Well,that's a good question. I think it. I think my partner and I Dan, at that point. You know, really we had a gut for whatneeded to happen with the business. I don't think we had the courageat that point in our career to because you see revenue coming in and youtry to protect it and then I the one thing I'll say about by partner, Dan, was note this, this doesn't feel right. We have tohave the hard conversations internally, and I...

...think o no nine forced our handbecause our own clients were telling us what we were great at. We justneeded help really creating the platform to have that. And Yeah, it did. I think it forced us a little bit. I think it would takeon another two years. It's interesting because that's a classic example of so oftenentrepreneurs, business owners tend to sell what they're comfortable selling or what they've beencomfortable making, even if the market shifts and over time you may very welllose touch with what your customers actually value. That you know, you may besending them an endvoice for x, but they're actually paying you for why? And that's kind of what was happening. Where than it yeah, and andand and I think what that did is it gave us a lot moreconfidence in our gut. Yeah, now, now, since that time, Imean we're, you know, will pivot on a dime. We hadto have some financial hardships and some pain to really realize that. You knowwhat, maybe, maybe, maybe our gut is right now. We needa lot of help to get there and get it done. But absolutely so, Colin, in your work, what you're doing now, if I understand this correctly, you're trying to affect everything the consumer sees touches experiences withyour clients. So it's from the first moment I interact with you as aconsumer, with whatever one of your clients is doing, you're trying to affectanything in a way that's moving people towards action that's beneficial to your clients.Absolutely, I think today there's so much noise in the system and so howdo you cut through that clutter? Yeah, there's a couple things. There's there'sa phrase we have in our understood which is that push or pull strategy. You're either trying to push content out to people or pull them towards you. We believe it's much much for cost productive to pull people towards you andthen deliver a connected customer experience, whether that be online through you know whathappens socially are on a website, physically, when when you interact with a productor a business in person and everything...

...you do so. So our ourwhole philosophy is we wanted to help our clients deliver an unfractured experience and aconsistent story for their customers. We do our job well if we teach ourcustomers how to tell the right story to their customers or their audience. Yeah, right, doesn't it doesn't necessarily have to be a cutsomer per se ortheir audience, hopefully at an informative time and their decisionmaking process for whatever thatwould be. Yeah, I'm getting really jazz even just thinking about what youguys do, because the other thing that I don't know that our audience fullyappreciates is the thought leadership that's going on in Cincinnati and Columbus Ohio with retailand brands like people just don't think of Ohio as driving so much thinking onyou know which traditional they were, which would be coming from the coasts.And here we are. You're playing with some big boys. I mean wego to your website, you got PNG, got cool scoping, you got Nike, you got Cummins engines, honey will. Did you find them?Did you knock on their door? Did they find you, or how doyour playing with the big boys? Yeah, that you know. It's funny,like we play with the big boys, but we first of all, you'reright about Ohio. I mean Ohio is an amazing place right now andyou see everything that's going on out west and on the East Coast and alot of people are starting to rethink their strategies on where they're going to be. And it was this whole second city concept right right Cincinnati and Columbus representsso much to the consumer landscape. You mentioned a couple of those folks earlierand you know, Gosh, look look at everything. That what nationwide meansto the city of Columbus. Look what procker and gamble meets to the cityof Cincinnati. And they've imported talent and then they keep talent and when thattalent leaves, they go out and they start their own things where they exporttalent into other industries. are other large organizations and they take people with them. And and so for us, you...

...know, I always tell our clients, look, don't choose us because of the work we have in your space. Choose us for the diversity when we have outside of it. You know, we have clients across the board. We have clients like Mike Albert LeaSing P and our communication. The list goes on and on, in clientsthat you haven't heard of yet. We have clients like the we've worked atthe archdiocese of Cincinnati, we've worked with pure romance. We were across theboard. We we sort of cover the spectrum and and it's because of theapproachability in the ability to basically make stronger connections with their customers and just tellgreat stories and in anymore a couple things that are that are sort of gone. It's nostalgia, right, and the style is coming back, the artof customer service. I'm telling you, you know, one of the ruleswe have for our teams here are look, you have a conversation with a customerevery five days. Not Be a text, not be a slack right, not via email. You have to pick up the phone and talk topeople and it's people look at me like I'm crazy and I'm like, I'mtelling you. So you know, at the end of the day, wesell results in an experience. That's the bottom line. And and you know, if you don't have that, you know you're not going to be abusiness much longer, at least in our space and right now and a lotindustries. And you know what, we're real fortunate because we have a tonof great clients across the board. It doesn't matter their size, it justyou know, they're defined by their ability to basically have a lot of passionfor what they do. And then we try to match that. Colin isresponsible for a phrase that I've some of my clients may have heard me use. I didn't give him credit, so I'm going to get it to himgive the get credit to him now, which was he has clients that hecalls churched and then those who are unchurched. And you want to explain the genesisof that comment. Well, I got to give John lycom is oneof our board members, credit for that, who's in a retired executive from proctorand Campbell and he sort of made a joke in a meeting you.I'm talking seven years ago. He said, man, I don't know. Youknow, to your point, you've...

...got the the honeywells of the worldand the Nikes and you know all the Tara Datas and JP Morgan's and thenthe other clients I mentioned, you know, like a Mike, Albert Leasing,our son sect and different brands you haven't heard of then. And youknow what? It's funny. It doesn't matter their size. You have clientsthat really get it and they understand that all their actions, behavior and behaviorsshtab meaning and intention and that connection to their customers and their customers customers isimportant and those clients are churched. They're very they're few and far between there. I'd say maybe three out of every ten people like Willie are in thepractice of strategic brandy, but the other seven to eight clients we serve aren't, but they want to be right. Those are unchurched and trust me,I as unchurched as they. Yet I got a whole group of people.Well, I say this they're not here, they're all working remote, but Ihave a whole bunch of people all over the country that our church.I'm the most unchurched guy to here and that relatability, I think, reallyhelps us when we're serving our clients. But I got to give credit work. Credit is to John Mikem came up with that. I've just used itto my own competitive advantage. Well, I love it and I think it'swonderful to describing a client who understands the business proposition or the business value thatyou might be able to offer and then somebody who wants, you know,a transaction but may not understand the value that you create. And so it'sit's a it's a very interesting way to think about the the work to bedone, to to can we convert them? I was a little I was alittle worried about what you're going to say when you mean you said youhad a quote. Yeah, well, there there are any number of them. Okay, we gotta we got to talk a little bit about the organizationalhealth component of your organization, because that's I think that's first real work Iever did for you. And hyperquake was around that space, wasn't I thinkthat that really Oh, I've done some professional management things, but the real, the real meat of the stuff is...

...helping you answer those six critical questions. And so what you've always paid me the ultimate compliment by saying I wantyou to come in and help me. I have no idea what you're goingto do, but I don't really care. Just do what you think we need. I got more of that on the docket to Ed. So it'sthe most important work that I think any organization can do. I mean,hands to out, it's were personally, I have the most passion. YouKnow Sherwood mcveagh, who's our teeth strategic officer, she shares that passion aswell. You know, there's this whole phrase that we're toying around with rightnow it's cultural branding, and I'll cheat. I'd say it's just the ED methodologiesof basically driving cohesion amongst the team and then we add branding on topof it. And it's the most important work you can do. I mean, look, hyperquake and its current form would not exist if it weren't forat Eppley. There's without question we went through quite a bit of change.Like I said, I've even say before, of seven ore. It was like, what the Hell am I doing here? How are we going toscale this thing to all the sudden we're making acquisitions and we're trying to integratenew teams, new habits and behaviors. And you know that that kid ofparts that you've always brought to the table has been simple. You know,spread to the tough conversations, have dialog and understand your superhuman strengths and andwe do that now with our clients. You know, will have conversations withmastercraft boat holdings around. You know, we're sitting in a room with ateam of executives and we're having dialog and we're talking about what keeps them upat night and we just spread to the tough conversation and then allow them tohave it. So we've really become a catalyst for that dialog. We reallydon't push it beyond to the level that you do both, but at leastwe have we're prepared now to have that dialog and in some ways pretend likewe actually know what we're talking about. But but the reality is at theend of the day, the branding tool kit that we pulled through this reallyhelps. Listeners that have read my book will have be familiar with your namebecause I actually write about you in the book and I talked about your successat managing and leading and I would I...

...would also hold up Colin is awonderful example of not feeling like he needs to be involved in every aspect ofthe business in order for the business to be successful. And I don't knowwhen you learned that, if that's it, if that was intuitive, or wasthat something learned back at the your VDC days? Ah, I haveto give Genie Bruce Credit for that. So one of the original founding partnersof hyperquake. She said she made a comment years ago and I was probablyaround, oh seven or eight, and she really just sort of put myplace, put myself in my place and said your control freak, and II'll never forget when she said it because there are some you know, wehad our moments that. I love her like a sister, but she wasalways the one who kept me on my toes and I think I realized likein any good organization, scale is trust and trust isn't something that you askfor, it just you either have it or you don't. And I thinkwhen she said that, you know, it made me take a hard lookon the inside and I think if you go back to the VDC days,you know, look, I think honesty's huge and I struggled with that foryears. As as someone who is a young manager at Van Dying Karate,you know the balance between telling people what you think they want to hear andyou know, we do our ed you've let us through those sessions before whereyou go around the table your biggest strength in your biggest weakness, what's theone thing that that person needs to work on? You know. So ifI go back to the van dying karate days and a lot of what mymanager, Chris Kimnett, would always tell me was you have to be morehonest and it's more about being honest with yourself with with what your true capacityis as a leader, because if you try to make something up our shieldthat with words are actions that aren't yours, you're in trouble. And Chris,Chris taught me that. And then fast forward to genies common and thenour sessions. I'll tell you holly shoemakers on our team. Holly will tellyou, she'll she'll tell me. My...

...greatest weakness was, I don't knowwhich you would say today, is telling people what they want to hear.And and I thought servant leadership was that. That's completely changed. And you know, I don't believe that you ever fire someone. You actually you werethe one who made the wrong hiring decision, and I believe that wholeheartedly, anda lot of people don't agree with me, but I think it's ourresponsibility to develop people and I think ultimately, yes, it started with the VDCdays and it's led up to where we are today, and that's howwe've created scale, I believe. Well, it's it's been remarkable to watch yourmaturing as a leader and and somebody who's been able to get the verymost out of people. And I would also hold you up as somebody who'sbeen a remarkable job at working with people to help them figure out how todevelop themselves and believing in them and sticking with them and continuing to share intheir struggle as they try to develop himself and not given up very easily.I think you've shown tremendous patients and belief in folks and I've seen it payoff for you. You've entertained several offers from other firms along the way inthe last few years and then decided to pass on those. I don't wantyou getting any details that you don't get into, but was that a toughdecision to think about? You know, giving up your some of your independence, or I mean clearly you chose to remain independent, but you had somechoices there. What help us understand how you went through that and how youmanage that? Somebody told me a long time ago, and you're gonna haveto tell me you said this, but the genies already out of the bottle. I don't I remember who said that totally. I might have said it, but maybe I watched, you know, a fourth generation family owned business.I watch what happened when I had to tell about a hundred and fiftyassociates that the business had been sold, and it was. That was probablythere are a few moments in my life, and probably five, that I canthink I'm an and you've been involved...

...in two of them, that havebeen instrumental and and my personal growth. So forget work, because for meI don't like work is an extension of it's just all connected anymore. AndI think to answer your question like like when I had to share the newsthat we had sold the Sinas, who was our largest competitor at the timeand somebody who we admired and respected a great deal, but I made aliving off of trying to kick their butt and we just sold to them.And the look on their faces, folks at the time that we're making six, seven, eight dollars an hour, you know, unloading one hundred poundwash acts, you know, washers and dryers. It was just like andI started to build equity over the years with them and I had to tellthem. So, fast forward to hyperquake. You know, I don't know whatthe future holds, but I do know this. I know that ifwe continue to operate like a high functioning team, this thing, this business, is going to outlast me. And you know, it's true, wehad unsolicited offers. I mean to the point where people were like, Hey, listen, I'm going to give you a letter of intent because of yourreputational value. And you know, five years ago, if you would havetold me that, you know, three years from then, I'd be gettingunsolicited offers for, you know, forget the monetary value, but but justfor the hard work we've done. I'd say, man, that that isamazing, because I think that's the true testament to everybody who comes in everyday and does hard work. And the reality is, remaining independent allows usto be agile and flexible and it gives us the type of leverage we needit to cast a wider funnel to help more people and, and it's honestsilly. My wife would tell you this, it's not about the money. It'sabout the difference we make in people's lives and the ability to change theirtrajectory. Personally and professionally, I see growth. Growth is defined by ourability to continue to expand our reach and run a profitable business and allows usto do other things with that capital, to, you know, invest inother ways for on behalf of our people...

...and get involved in nonprofits. Sofor us this is really been a great vehicle for us to basically live livea better and more whole life. And that's what I think of it now. Three years ago, ed, I didn't think that way. It wasstrictly the monetary value of the business. And in today, what what theMelissa Kelly's and the Sherry arms and the Andrew Peters and the Damn Barzaks andMarty Kirsty's molly bakers and the show a Louis has? A list goes downeand on and on all the way down and Ryan betting the house. IsWhat they what they've taught us is that we're not a family, but we'reclose and we've become a place that people just love to be and I don'tsee myself ever doing anything else anymore. Couple years ago I couldn't say that, but I absolutely love what we do. Well, I think. I thinkfacing the possibility of, you know, selling your business forces you to decidewhat you're really all about, and so you've gone through that test andand you've answered the question for yourself and that's wonderful. You know, wealways promise our listeners at least one proven practical idea that they can apply thathelps them run a more successful and sustainable business. So I'm I'm asking youto think about all the things you know to be true and helping you runyour business. If there's just one thing that our listeners could do to runa better business or even run a better team, what would it be?In your mind, your Heart's going to tell you what your head hasn't figuredout yet. Just sprint to it, man, just spread to it.Life's too short and you know, I've learned that over the last year watchingfamily members go through some things, and it's been tough. I mean Ihave a brother in law all that a cancer survivor, Mollie Baker, whoyou know, cancer survivor that I got to tell you. Rob Shown feltand when his brother and Molly you'll hear it in my voice. It getsme. It changed me when Molly was diagnosed with cancer and rob was diagnosedwith cancer. It it shook me pretty good because it realized, it mademe realize how valuable life is and for...

...us, I think life's too damnshort to sit around and wait for something to happen. Get your ass upoff the chair, go have the tough conversations and don't be afraid to makea decision. So I would say listen to your heart. It's going totell you what your head hasn't figured out yet. I don't know where Iread it. It was I don't know. I read it's at an airport orsomewhere. I'm not sure, but it's sort of been what he drivesme every day. Hopefully that helps. I love it. I really appreciateit. I Love You, Colin. You've been a goodie and and someonewho I've got tremendous respect for. He's quite an individual. If people wantto reach out to you and learn more about either hyperquake or anything that youshared, what's the best way for them to reach you, Colin? Ohgo to our website. Easy. Go to our website or contact page.You can just sort of you'll itself navigatable, but you'll find out inquiries here.Collaborate inquiries, collaborate, collaborates. The best way to emails go directlyto me and always, always make time. hyperquake all one word. Hype arequake all one word and there in Cincinnati, Ohio. He's a goodman and he'll help you. Thank you. So much for being a guest onthe Ed Eple Experience College. Thanks that. I appreciate it. Thankyou for listening to the ED Epple experience. For more information on building a moresustainable, smarter and Healthier Business, visit www the eply groupcom for resources, tips and D's latest blocks. That's the EPLE EPP l Ey groupcom.Plus, take a free assessment at the eply Groupcom assessment to find out howyou measure up as a highly skilled and accomplished manager and where to focus onimproving your skills.

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